1926: Chapel roof blown away

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Shortly after a service at Nantmor Methodist Chapel, near Portmadoc, on Wednesday night, the entire slated roof of the chapel, including the rafters, was blown away, the greater portion dropping on the roofs of three houses 60 yards away and smashing the roofs and windows.  Fortunately no one was hurt, but the damaged houses had to be vacated.

The Times, 1 January 1926

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1921: Grant to poet

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The Prime Minister has obtained a grant of £100 from the Royal Bounty Fund to Mr. G. Williams (Carneddog), a Welsh farmer and poet who lives at Nantmor, a small village at the foot of Snowdon, in recognition of his services to Welsh literature and poetry.

Published by Hartlepool Northern Daily Mail, 14 June 1921

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1916: A Beddgelert Soldier’s Letter

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First Night Under Fire.

A BEDDGELERT SOLDIER’S LETTER.

Private Bob Thomas late of Cwmcloch, Beddgelert, in a letter to a friend dated October 31st from France, says: –

“ I have been over here about six weeks now. I can’t say I enjoy it; but I don’t grumble. It’s good to see a bit of the world and to see what war is like. I always wanted to come out here, but I must confess there have been moments when I felt sorry I have had to come. I have now an idea of what war is like.

The first day I went into the firing line Fritz gave us a lively time. I shall never forget that first day. It was a Sunday. When we got within range of the German guns I was a bit nervous, especially when the shells dropped around us in the trenches. I kept my eye on an old soldier and soon found out what was the best thing to do. I soon found the truth of the old proverb “Example is better than precept. ‘

Next day, about five p.m., Fritz started shelling again, and I thought my time was up. If somebody was to tell me before I came out here that things are as terrible as they actually are out here I would never have believed them. It simply rained shells that night. Thank God for that old soldier who stood near me. He heartened one as he stood there like a statue, never moving only to dodge the shells.

My courage nearly failed me that night; but that old soldier standing near me helped me to stand firm and copy his example. Well, Fritz got tired of it in about half an hour. I expect he thought we were all dead. We came off with surprisingly few casualties. I was none the worse, only half buried twice. A piece of shrapnel went through my steel helmet, but it did not hurt me; its force was checked.”

 

Source: The Cambrian News and Merionethshire Standard, published 1 December 1916

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1916: Saved by a Gift

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Private Griffith Pritchard Davies, Beddgelert, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, was saved from death by his cigarette case during the offensive in France. A piece of shrapnel rebounded from the case, taking part of his arm away. The case was presented to him by a Beddgelert friend when the soldier was home at Whitsun, and Davies, in accepting the gift, jocularly remarked, “Perhaps this will save my life.”

Private Evan Harris, Borthygest, Portmadoc, of the Welsh Fusiliers, and Private David John Williams, Beddgelert, of the Liverpool “Pals” have been killed in action, and Regimental Sergeant-Major Simms, Portmadoc, of the Welsh Fusiliers, has been dangerously wounded.

Published by Liverpool Echo, 15 July 1916

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1910: Rhyd-Ddu – Lecture

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In the Literary and Debating Society of the above place held last Tuesday evening, a lecture was delivered by Mr T. H. Parry-Williams, B.A., Oxford, a native of the place. His subject was “Ieuenctid y Dydd,” and he dealt with the young Welsh poets that have lately published their works. The lecturer criticised and eulogised the works of Eifion Wyn, Emyr, Moelwyn, W. Wyn Williams, Silyn, and W. J. Griffith, in a very keen and masterful manner, and recited most effectively specimens from the lyrics of each poet. Though much had been written to the contrary, from time to time, he considered the present age, so far, the golden age of Welsh poetry. The interest of the audience was kept without flagging from beginning to end by the many and varied recitations the lecturer gave from the poets under consideration

Published in Carnavon and Denbigh Herald, 14 January 1910

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1909: Heavy Fine for Dynamiting a Salmon River

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John William Jones and Robert Pierce, Beddgelert, the latter in service with Jones’s mother, at Portmadoc admitted using dynamite to destroy fish in the Glaslyn, the chief salmon river of Snowdonia. A water bailliff, who was in hiding for several hours, caught them dynamiting a pool in which two salmon had been seen. The salmon, however, escaped before the explosion. Jones was fined £7 10s with 32 6d costs, and Pierce 10s 6d witthout costs.

Published by Western Times, 13 September 1909

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1909: Death of Glaslyn

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DEATH OF GLASLYN – A WELL KNOWN WELSH WRITER – FACTS OF HIS CAREER

After a prolonged illness, Glaslyn, the well-known Welsh bard, died last Sunday night at Llys Ednyfed, Penrhyndeudraeth, aged 80 years. He was a native of Llanfrothen, and resided for many years at Beddgelert, where he filled the office of deacon at the C. M. Chapel. For a time he kept a bookseller’s shop, and also worked as a quarryman. He and Glasynys were great personal friends. Glaslyn was a ravenous reader both of English and Welsh books, and he became an authority on Beddgelert antiquities. His nervous style, whether poetry or prose, made him a very popular writer. His many articles in “Y Cymru” and other periodicals, showed him to be a man well versed in the literature and the history of the subjects he treated upon. Politically he was a Labourite, and when the late Mr Morgan Lloyd came out as an Independent candidate for the representation of Merioneth in Parliament, Glaslyn stumped the county on his behalf. In spite of infirmity, adversity, and other disheartening circumstances, Glaslyn kept on writing and reading. The last time the writer of this note saw him, the bard was in bed reading one of Hawthorne’s books. Had the deceased had the same genius for self-control as he had for literature, he would have attained a high place in the ranks of Welsh authors. His poetical works are being collected, with a view to publication, by Cameddog.

Source: The North Wales Express, published 19 March 1909

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1907: Obituary – Mr A B Priestley

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On Wednesday morning, the death occurred of Mr A. B. Priestley Cae Dafydd, Nantmor. He was the youngest son of Mr John Priestley, Cae Dafydd, and Hirdrefaig, Anglesey, and was 52 years of age. Mr Priestley was a brother of Mr C. F. Priestley, Hirdrefaig, and was a notable figure in the Eryri district. He stood 6ft. 7in. in his stocking feet, and was in great repute in hunting and sporting circles.

North Wales Express, 17 May 1907

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1906: The Storm

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A cloud burst over the pretty and romantic village of Beddgelert. The roads for miles around were flooded. The famous Beddgelert bridge was swept away. Houses in low-lying districts were ten feet in water and many cornfields ruined.

Published by Manchester Courier, 4 August 1906

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