1880: Beddgelert – Fatal Accident

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An inquest was held on Monday, May 10, at the Schoolroom, Beddgelert, before T. Hunter Hughes, Esq., deputy coroner, on the body of John Jennings, a boy of twelve years old, who was killed by being run over by the waggon attached to a traction engine. It appears that deceased and his mother, who were tramps, walked on Monday from Portmadoc towards Beddgelert, and when by Pant-yr-oer deceased said he was very tired, and at his request she walked on, leaving him to rest. The steam traction engine came past soon afterwards, and deceased was seen by the driver of the engine to get on one of the trucks attached. He was not again noticed by the driver; but a woman, who was in one of the trucks, saw him getting out when near the entrance to the village. He seemed to get out carefully, and she was not aware but that he got out allright. Deceased was, however, found shortly afterwards by Mr. Humphreys of the Goat Hotel lying in a heap on the road, and on going to him it was found that his head had been fearfully crushed by the wheel of the wagon. A verdict in accordance with the facts was returned.

The Cambian News, 14 May 1880

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1877: Found dead in car

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On Sunday, November 11. Robert Evans, driver at the Prince of Wales Hotel, Beddgelert, took a party from that village to Rhyd-ddu. He started at 9.30p.m., the weather being very rough. On Monday morning, as the people were going to work, he was found sitting in the car with the reins and the whip in his hands, but quite dead. The horse, which was still in the car, had gone over the bridge, and sought shelter between the Ginshop Bach Inn and the next house. Deceased was about sixty years of age, and was not known to be an intemperate man.

Source: The Cambrian News and Merionethshire Standard, published 16 November 1877

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1876: Beddgelert Wedding

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Considerable interest was manifested at Beddgelert on Friday, the 2nd inst., on the marriage of Mr Evan Jones, who has for twelve years been master of the national school, to Miss Ellen Griffith, of Gwynant-street, Beddgelert. The service was conducted by the Rev. R. E. Priestley, incumbent of the parish. The bridegroom’s best man was Mr R. E. Williams, Portmadoc; Miss Jane Jones acted as bridesmaid. After the service the company drove to the Snowdon Ranger Hotel, where an excellent luncheon was served. On leaving and returning to the village the party was loudly cheered by the school children, who were allowed a holiday in honour of the event, and in the evening received a liberal supply of nuts and oranges.

Source: North Wales Chronicle, published 10 June 1876

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1874: An Englishman speaks Welsh

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For Welshmen to learn to express their thoughts in English is now so universal throughout the Principality as to be taken as a matter of course, but the converse is just as rare. Last week, however, Captain J. Roberts, of the Symdde Dylluan Mine, delivered a lecture in the Congregational Chapel, Drws-y-coed, on Gas,” in Welsh, though an Englishman. As nothing is so entertaining to a Cymro as to hear an Englishman speak Welsh, there was a full house.

Cambrian News and Merionethshire Standard, 25 December 1874

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1873: Thunderstorm

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Early on Friday morning, the 3rd inst., the above district was visited by one of the most severe storms experienced for some years, the flashes of lightning being almost incessant. A small chapel in the upper part of Nantmor, belonging to the Calvinistic Methodists, was almost destroyed by the lightning. It seems that the electric fluid first struck the earth about five yards from the end of the chapel, passed under a boundary wall and a small stable without doing any damage, then struck the gable end opposite the fire-grate, which it forced in, breaking every pane of glass in the building, and smashing the pulpit and several seats. It appears then to have travelled up the chimney flue, until it reached within a few feet of the top, where it scattered, blowing off nearly the whole of the roof of the building, and throwing the heavy stones of the chimney stack to a considerable distance. It also killed some sheep which happened to be near at the time.

With these warnings, it is worth enquiring how many of our chapels, erected at so great a cost, are furnished with lightning conductors?

Source: Llangollen Advertiser, published 17 January 1873

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1871: A New Bridge

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The attractive village of Beddgelert has been made additionally picturesque by the construction of a fine bridge, of the best materials and workmanship, connecting the houses on the island at that place with the main road. This has given accommodation to the poorer inhabitants, and to the public generally, which has long been felt. The expense of the work has been generously borne by the respected owner of the property, J. R. Ormsby Gore, Esq., M.P., Porkington; and that gentleman’s efficient agent, Mr J. Parry, Glynn Hall, has, by the inauguration of this convenience, deserved and obtained the thanks of many.

Source: The Cambrian News and Merionethshire Standard, published 4 August 1871

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1865: Rejoicings on the Marriage of W. Griffith Esq., to Miss Priestley

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Beddgelert – Marriage Celebration

On Thursday last the marriage of Mr. Wynn Griffith and Miss Priestley was celebrated with due honour and respect to the illustrious couple. At 7 o’clock, the day was ushered in by the firing of rock and other cannon, which, notwithstanding the unpropitious state of the weather, was continued at intervals during the whole of the day. At 3 o’clock the children of both schools, amounting to about 200, met at the National School, and partook of an excellent tea, with plenty of “bara brith,” buns, &c., to their hearts’ content, and to which they seemed to do ample justice. After tea was over, “Long life to Victoria,” “God bless the Prince of Wales,” and “God save the Queen,” were rendered by the children in a most creditable and artistic manner. An orange was presented to each child on their departure. At5 o’clock a number of friends sat down at the Goat Hotel to a sumptuous dinner, which, be it said, to the credit of all concerned, passed off most satisfactorily and comfortably. After the usual toasts of the day, the health of Mr. and Mrs. Wynn Griffith was drank with great enthusiasm and musical honours, with long life and much happiness to both. In the evening a beautiful bonfire was kindled on the top of Craigadwy above the village. All the cottages in the town were most brilliantly illuminated, and over the porticoes at the hotel and Erw Fair hung well-designed mottoes tastefully decorated with evergreen and flags, and illuminated the whole, combining to make the scene most lively, pleasant, and comfortable. At a late hour some fine rockets were let off to the great amusement and satisfaction of all the spectators.

 

North Wales Chronicle, Saturday 8 April 1865

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1865: Beddgelert and Portmadoc Railway

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We understand that the first sod of this branch of railway will be cut at Beddgelert some day next week, a full report of the proceedings of which will appear in this paper. This line will join the tramway which has been made from the Croesor Quarry to the Port near to the Glaslyn Inn, and will be carried beyond the harbour of Portmadoc to the Borth. As there are a great many mines in the neighbourhood of Beddgelert, some of which cannot now be profitably worked because of the difficulty and the expense of transit; and as during the summer a great number of tourists and business men visit the village and the picturesque neighbourhood, this line will be a great accommodation to the public and will be certain to pay a good dividend. The whole of the land has been already purchased, and an Act of Parliament is only required to grant running powers over the existing Croesor railway, and to extend the same for a few yards to the open harbour at Borth. There will be a grand dinner at the Goat Hotel on the day the first sod is cut.

North Wales Chronicle, 25 February 1865

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1865: Brynfelin and Rhyd Ddu Copper Mines

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Dinner at the Goat Hotel.- On Monday evening last, the new Company which have purchased both of the above mines gave a dinner to all the workmen employed in them, to the number of 53, at the Goat Hotel, Beddgelert. Mr. Wm. Powell, the Agent, likewise invited a number of his personal friends to join in the festive proceedings, so that the total number of guests which sat down to dinner was 68. The day was held pretty much as a holiday in the village and cannons were fired in rapid succession from morning until night. The spread provided by Mrs. Pritchard, was a most recherche and superb one, and did great credit to this renowned establishment. It was served up in the large coffee room of the hotel. Dinner was placed on the table at 2 o’clock in the afternoon, the Rev. R. E. Priestley occupying the chair, and Mr. Pritchard, Proprietor of the Hotel, the Vice Chair. Amongst the Company, in addition to the above two gentlemen, were the following–R. Roberts, Esq., Surgeon, Portmadoc; Mr. Powell, Agent at the two mines in question; Mr. G. Hughes, Agent at the Ffirdd Slate Quarry; Mr. J. Roberts, Agent of the Prince of Wales Quarry; Mr. J. Roberts, Agent of the Snowdon Slate Quarry; and Mr. W. Jones, Agent of the Berllwyd and Gerynt Quarry. After the dinner was concluded a most pleasant and convivial evening was spent by all the guests, and the healths of the Brynfelin and Rhyd Ddu Copper Mine Company; “Mr. Powell, the Agent,” and “Mr. Pritchard, for his very excellent dinner” were drunk with the utmost enthusiasm and good will. A great number of capital songs were sung during the evening and altogether a more pleasant and agreeable evening has not been enjoyed in the beautiful little village of Beddgelert, for some time past.

North Wales Chronicle, 25 February 1865

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