1895: Sudden Death of a Welsh Minister

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The Rev. William Ellis, Calvanistic Methodist minister, Beddgelert, whilst speaking at a church meeting on Friday night, complained of being unwell, and not able to proceed any further. He was then seen to fall on his side. Dr. Evans, Portmadoc, was sent for, but the reverend gentleman never regained consciousness, and died on Saturday morning, from apoplexy. He was 68 years old, and had been a successful pastor for many years.

Published by Cardiff Times, 20 July 1895

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1891: Landlord Tyranny in Wales

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Sir Edward Watkin, M.P., remarks the London Daily News, as a Welsh landlord, is seeking to undo mischief which his predecessors wrought. Publicity was given a few years ago to a painful case near Beddgelert, where a small company of Welsh Methodists found that the lease on their little chapel and chapel house had expired, and that they could only retain the buildings by surrendering part of the site and paying the sum of £400 sterling. After leaving the chapel for awhile they paid the sum and regained possession. Sir Edward Watkin, who has a chalet near Beddgelert, has now become the landlord, and he has restored the portion of the site that was lost, and given substantial aid. Writing to the Rev. T. Gwynedd Roberts to acknowledge a resolution of thanks, Sir Edward expresses himself in the following emphatic terms:- “My little contributions to the Bethania Chapel, especially the land, were not merely the proper donations of a landlord to good religious work, but were to some extent influenced by my indignation at the harsh and excessive terms inflicted upon the congregation by my predecessor in the possesion of the land. If the Church of England in Wales is to be disestablished, such cases as that of Bethania may well be quoted as showing the tyranny of a dominant sect – landowners all the same.”

Published by Cardiff Times, 5 September 1891

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1873: Thunderstorm

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Early on Friday morning, the 3rd inst., the above district was visited by one of the most severe storms experienced for some years, the flashes of lightning being almost incessant. A small chapel in the upper part of Nantmor, belonging to the Calvinistic Methodists, was almost destroyed by the lightning. It seems that the electric fluid first struck the earth about five yards from the end of the chapel, passed under a boundary wall and a small stable without doing any damage, then struck the gable end opposite the fire-grate, which it forced in, breaking every pane of glass in the building, and smashing the pulpit and several seats. It appears then to have travelled up the chimney flue, until it reached within a few feet of the top, where it scattered, blowing off nearly the whole of the roof of the building, and throwing the heavy stones of the chimney stack to a considerable distance. It also killed some sheep which happened to be near at the time.

With these warnings, it is worth enquiring how many of our chapels, erected at so great a cost, are furnished with lightning conductors?

Source: Llangollen Advertiser, published 17 January 1873

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